Page 91 - Skills Needed for Effective International Marketing: Training Implications
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                       (8) assess foreign market size and potential; (9) evaluate and select appropriate

                       foreign market entry alternatives; and (10) evaluate and select international


                       pricing strategies.


                              The top ten skills were evenly spread among the general skill categories

                       of planning and operational skills (three), pricing skills (two), product skills (two),


                       and distribution skills (two).  The promotional skill category contained only one

                       of the ten most important skills.


                              The ten skills which practitioners possessed the least were: (1) evaluate

                       and select appropriate telemarketing organization; (2) evaluate and select


                       appropriate public/governmental relations specialists; (3) analyze and manage

                       "gray market" activity; (4) evaluate and select appropriate international


                       advertising agency; (5) explore other promotional alternatives that may be

                       characteristic of a given country; (6) conduct a global competitive analysis;


                       (7) assess foreign market legal environment implications; (8) assess

                       international marketing training needs; (9) review various classification


                       numbering systems (e.g., SIC, HTS, SITC); and (10) appropriately utilize U.S.


                       state and federal export promotion programs.

                              These ten skills, rated as having the lowest degrees of possession, were


                       concentrated in the categories of promotional skills (five) and planning and

                       operational skills (three).  The pricing skill and product skill categories contained


                       one each, and there were zero distribution skills of the lowest ten.



                                                        © 1998 Ralph Jagodka
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